Other links:

Other links:

Nature’s Futures

This course examines the relation betwe

This course examines the relation between human and non-human worlds as an enduring question in anthropology. We will explore diverse ideas relating to the themes of “nature”, wilderness, “natural resources”, animalities, the environment and the state, and ecological justice. Against the current global environmental crisis, in which both human and non-human futures are deeply entangled and endangered, we consider what critical tools anthropology may offer for rethinking ethics and politics beyond the human.

Some of the questions we consider include:

- What does it mean to be “human” in the anthropocene?

- How did human and non human futures come to be so deeply entangled and endangered?

- How does one rethink ideas of the “difference” between the human and the non-human?

- How can we think of more-than-human compositions and assemblages?

en human and non-human worlds as an enduring question in anthropology. We will explore diverse ideas relating to the themes of “nature”, wilderness, “natural resources”, animalities, the environment and the state, and ecological justice. Against the current global environmental crisis, in which both human and non-human futures are deeply entangled and endangered, we consider what critical tools anthropology may offer for rethinking ethics and politics beyond the human.

Some of the questions we consider include:

- What does it mean to be “human” in the anthropocene?

- How did human and non human futures come to be so deeply entangled and endangered?

- How does one rethink ideas of the “difference” between the human and the non-human?

- How can we think of more-than-human compositions and assemblages?

Study at Ashoka

Study at Ashoka